spread

spread vb Spread, circulate, disseminate, diffuse, propagate, radiate can all mean to extend or cause to extend over an area or space.
Spread basically implies a drawing or stretching out to the limit
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spread a net

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spread a cloth on the ground

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the bird spreads its wings

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spread a sail

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and in the sense here considered emphasizes distribution or dispersion (as by strewing or scattering or being strewed or scattered) over an extent of space that may be large or small or incalculable or calculable
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spread fertilizer over a field

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this troublesome weed has spread over a large section of the country

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Often it suggests an applying in or a taking the form of a thin layer
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spread butter on bread

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the paint spreads thinly and evenly

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the clouds shifted, spread against the sky . . . and enveloped everything below— Styron

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or a making or becoming more prevalent or more widely known or felt
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don't go on spreading that nonsense— Rose Macaulay

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the heretic should be crushed before his heresy can spreadFitzroy Maclean

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news of us might spread far beyond that town— Ship'ton

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Circulate may imply in its primary and largely technical use a continuous or repeated movement over the same course from starting point to starting point
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the blood circulates from the heart through the arteries and veins back to the heart again

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steam circulating through a heating system

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In its more general applications the term tends to stress a moving about or a causing to move about freely and continuously, often to the more or less complete loss of the notion of going over the same course again and again
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the seats were being filled up rapidly and a pleasant noise circulated in the auditorium— Joyce

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the satire, circulating in manuscript copies, had a great local vogue— Lucas

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all of us circulating ominously, and incognito, throughout the city, sizing up elevator operators— Salinger

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Disseminate implies much the same as spread when that word suggests distribution here and there
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disseminate information

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the London ladies were indignant, and naturally they started disseminating a vast amount of fruity gossip about the new Lady Turton— Dahl

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in those days the Boy Scout movement was already in existence, but it had still to disseminate sound views about knot-tying among the rising generation— H. G. Wells

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Diffuse suggests a spreading throughout a space; it is applied primarily to things (as sound, light, odor, or vapor) that in moving permeate the medium through which they move and in its extended sense to things (as education, knowledge, fame, and spirit) that have or are felt to have a similar pervasive quality in their dissemination
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the colors of the sky are due to minute particles diffused through the atmosphere— Tyndall

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it would surely be hard to find any country . . . where instruction is more widely diffusedEllis

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a State in which power is concentrated will ... be more bellicose than one in which power is diffusedRussell

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the so-called "correct speech" is being diffused to the mass of the populace through migration, mass education, and . . . communication media— Amer. Sociological Review

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Propagate (see also GENERATE; compare propaganda under PUBLICITY) implies extension for the sake of increase (as of believers or members or of activity or operation)
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propagate the faith

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propagate a false rumor

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I am bound by my own definition of criticism: a disinterested endeavor to learn and propagate the best that is known and thought in the world— Arnold

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Extraordinary plebeians who rise sharply . . . and so propagate the delusion that all other plebeians would do the same thing if they had the chance— Mencken

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Radiate implies a spreading from a center outward in or as if in rays; in general use it is often applied to the spreading of something material or immaterial from a fixed center
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soul- searching Freedom! here assume thy stand, and radiate hence to every distant land— Barlow

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her face . . . was still pretty, even with the web of little wrinkles that radiated from the corners of her eyes— Basso

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a superb self- confidence radiated from him, as it does from any healthy animal— Gibbons

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but in its common technical use the term is largely restricted in reference to diffusion in the form of rays (as of heat or light)
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the sun radiates both light and heat

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Analogous words: *distribute, dispense, deal: *scatter, dissipate
spread n *expanse, amplitude, stretch
Analogous words: extent, area, magnitude, *size: *range, reach, scope, compass

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Spread — may refer to: *Statistical dispersion *Spread (food), an edible paste put on other foods *the score difference being wagered on in spread betting *the measure of line inclination in rational trigonometry *Temperature Dewpoint spread, dew point… …   Wikipedia

  • Spread — (spr[e^]d), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Spread}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Spreading}.] [OE. spreden, AS. spr[ae]dan; akin to D. spreiden, spreijen, LG. spreden, spreen, spreien, G. spreiten, Dan. sprede, Sw. sprida. Cf. {Spray} water flying in drops.] 1. To… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • spread — n 1 a: the difference between any two prices for similar articles the spread between the list price and the market price of an article b: the difference between the highest and lowest prices of a product or security for a given period c: the… …   Law dictionary

  • spread — [spred] vt. spread, spreading [ME spreden < OE sprædan, akin to Ger spreiten < IE * sprei d , to sprinkle, strew < base * (s)p(h)er , to strew, spray, burst (of buds) > SPRAY1, SPRAWL, SPROUT] 1. to draw out so as to display more… …   English World dictionary

  • Spread — est un mot anglais qui signifie, entre autres, écart. Son utilisation, sur les marchés financiers, sous cette acception, est universelle et très diverse. Sur tous les marchés Bid/Ask, de Bid and Ask spread Calendar spread Expiry spread Sur les… …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Spread — 〈[sprɛ̣d] m. 6 oder n. 15〉 Zinsaufschlag auf einen Basiszins, der mit sinkender Bonität des Kreditnehmers u. sinkendem Wettbewerb aufseiten des Kreditgebers steigt [engl., „Verbreitung, Verteilung, Streuung“] * * * Spread [sprɛd], der; s, s [engl …   Universal-Lexikon

  • Spread — Spread, n. 1. Extent; compass. [1913 Webster] I have got a fine spread of improvable land. Addison. [1913 Webster] 2. Expansion of parts. [1913 Webster] No flower hath spread like that of the woodbine. Bacon. [1913 Webster] 3. A cloth used as a… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Spread — Spread, v. i. 1. To extend in length and breadth in all directions, or in breadth only; to be extended or stretched; to expand. [1913 Webster] Plants, if they spread much, are seldom tall. Bacon. [1913 Webster] Governor Winthrop, and his… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Spread — Spread, imp. & p. p. of {Spread}, v. [1913 Webster] {Spread eagle}. (a) An eagle with outspread wings, the national emblem of the United States. (b) The figure of an eagle, with its wings elevated and its legs extended; often met as a device upon …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Spread — es la diferencia entre el precio de compra y el de venta de un activo financiero. Es una especie de margen que se utiliza para medir la liquidez del mercado. Generalmente márgenes más estrechos representan un nivel de liquidez más alto. En el… …   Wikipedia Español


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